Las cookies nos ayudan a ofrecer nuestros servicios. Al utilizar nuestros servicios, aceptas el uso de cookies.

Editorial Cuvillier

Publicaciones, tesis doctorales, capacitaciónes para acceder a una cátedra de universidad & prospectos.
Su editorial internacional especializado en ciencias y economia

Editorial Cuvillier

De En Es
Target-related Coupling in Bimanual Coordination

Impresion
EUR 27,00 EUR 25,65

E-Book
EUR 18,90

Target-related Coupling in Bimanual Coordination (Tienda española)

Matthias Weigelt (Autor)

Previo

Indice, Datei (6,1 KB)
Lectura de prueba, Datei (53 KB)

ISBN-10 (Impresion) 3865374808
ISBN-13 (Impresion) 9783865374806
ISBN-13 (E-Book) 9783736914803
Idioma Deutsch
Numero de paginas 172
Edicion 1 Aufl.
Lugar de publicacion Göttingen
Lugar de la disertacion München
Fecha de publicacion 04.07.2005
Clasificacion simple Tesis doctoral
Area Psicología
Descripcion

It is concluded that the control of bimanual actions can be explained by target coordination. Experimental evidence has been provided to support the notion that the bimanual coupling effects observed during the simultaneous coordination of the two hands relate to movement targets, but not to the movements themselves. These bimanual coupling effects are transient, as the initial preparation advantage for bimanual movements to the same targets vanishes with longer time to prepare the actions. The transient target-coupling hypothesis states that bimanual movements directed at different targets can be prepared equally well as bimanual movements directed at the same targets when there is sufficient time for movement preparation to take place. It is further suggested that participants established a mental representation of the action environment (task set), where the actions targets were represented in terms of their spatial correspondence relative to the active effectors (relative spatial-position hypothesis). The present findings are in line with theories emphasizing the roles of movement-extrinsic targets and intended action goals on action control. Thus, the coordination of the two hands must be seen in service of these external targets and action goals.