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Impact of diets differing in fat and fiber content on intestinal microbiota, microbial activity and metabolic markers in a pig model

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EUR 41,60

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EUR 29,12

Impact of diets differing in fat and fiber content on intestinal microbiota, microbial activity and metabolic markers in a pig model

Sonja Heinritz (Autor)

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Leseprobe, Datei (690 KB)
Inhaltsverzeichnis, Datei (590 KB)

ISBN-13 (Printausgabe) 9783736993402
ISBN-13 (E-Book) 9783736983403
Sprache Englisch
Seitenanzahl 162
Umschlagkaschierung glänzend
Auflage 1.
Erscheinungsort Göttingen
Promotionsort Hohenheim
Erscheinungsdatum 30.08.2016
Allgemeine Einordnung Dissertation
Fachbereiche Land- und Agrarwissenschaften
Schlagwörter Pig, diet, microbiota
Beschreibung

The human intestinal microbial ecosystem plays an important role in maintaining health. Thereby, dietary modulation appears to be an efficient tool to beneficially steer microbial composition and metabolism. Within this regard, there is a considerable need for animal models to study potential ways of influencing health by dietary means. Thus, the objective of this thesis was to evaluate the use of the pig as potential model for research into dietary modulation of the human gut microbiota. First, a comprehensive literature review was given, comparing the human with the porcine gut microbiota and discussing existing studies concerning microbiota related diseases using the pig as a model. Furthermore, in a study with pigs, the effect of two different types of diets varying substantially in fat and fiber content on gut microbiota and microbial metabolites in feces and digesta samples was determined. High fiber content stimulated bacteria considered beneficial due to potential probiotic properties, particularly in view of human health. On the other hand, a high fat content fostered potential pathogenic bacteria. These data support diet as an important factor that shapes gut microbial community in a similar way to humans, which can help to establish the pig as a model for the evaluation of diverse forms of nutrition and dietary components.