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Effects of Catecholamine  Depletion in Unmedicated,  Remitted Subjects with  Bulimia Nervosa and  Healthy Subjects

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Effects of Catecholamine Depletion in Unmedicated, Remitted Subjects with Bulimia Nervosa and Healthy Subjects

Simona Grob (Author)

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ISBN-13 (Hard Copy) 9783954045723
ISBN-13 (eBook) 9783736945722
Language English
Page Number 72
Edition 1 Aufl.
Publication Place Göttingen
Place of Dissertation Zürich
Publication Date 2014-01-29
General Categorization Dissertation
Departments Psychology
Human medicine
Keywords bulimia nervosa, catecholamine depletion, dopamine, norepinephrine, pathophysiology, behavioral effects, reward, Psychiatrie und psychologische Medizin
Description

This thesis consists of two reports focusing on the role of catecholaminergic function in the pathophysiologic mechanism of bulimia nervosa (BN). The study presented in Report 1 and in Report 2 is the first, to our knowledge, that applied the paradigm of catecholamine depletion in unmedicated remitted female subjects with bulimia nervosa (rBN) and healthy controls. In Report 1 the aim of the study was to examine a hypothesized catecholaminergic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of BN by assessing behavioral effects of catecholamine depletion in rBN. Report 2 investigated whether responses of the brain reward system using a probabilistic reward task differ between remitted female subjects with BN and healthy female controls following catecholamine depletion. Our findings support the notion of catecholaminergic dysfunction as a possible trait abnormality in BN. Moreover our results support the belief of a disturbance of the central reward processing system in rBN related to altered brain catecholamine levels.