Cookies help us deliver our services. By using our services, you agree to our use of cookies.
De En Es
Kundenservice: +49 (0) 551 - 547 24 0

Cuvillier Verlag

Publications, Dissertations, Habilitations & Brochures.
International Specialist Publishing House for Science and Economy

Cuvillier Verlag

Premiumpartner
De En Es
Titelbild-leitlinien
Effects of Stress on the Psychobiology of Women‘s Reproduction

Hard Copy
EUR 29.85 EUR 28.36

E-book
EUR 20.90

Effects of Stress on the Psychobiology of Women‘s Reproduction

Simona Palm-Fischbacher (Author)

Preview

Extract, PDF (180 KB)
Table of Contents, PDF (23 KB)

ISBN-13 (Hard Copy) 9783954046478
ISBN-13 (eBook) 9783736946477
Language English
Page Number 174
Lamination of Cover glossy
Edition 1. Aufl.
Publication Place Göttingen
Place of Dissertation Zürich
Publication Date 2014-05-20
General Categorization Dissertation
Departments Psychology
Keywords stress, menstrual cycle, mating preferences
Description

The present thesis aimed to investigate the effects of stress on women’s reproductive system and mating behavior. For this purpose, an online study about the association between chronic psychosocial stress, potential protective factors such as dispositional resilience, and menstrual cycle regularity was conducted. The results suggest that chronic stress and resilience have a main effect on menstrual cycle regularity. Additionally, women with greater resilience have a reduced risk of irregular menstrual cycles in the face of low to moderate chronic stress; however, this association changes at the highest level of chronic stress. Furthermore, in an experimental study, women’s mate-choice behaviors, such as masculinity preference, were assessed, with a particular emphasis on hormonal dynamics throughout the menstrual cycle in interaction with stress induction. Women were found to prefer more masculine men before ovulation than in the mid-luteal phase, whereby estradiol seemed to predict masculinity preference. In addition, compared to a control condition, women exposed to a stressful condition experienced a decrease in male masculinity preference.